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‘I Felt Like I’d Lost A Sense of Who I Was’: Hunter Biden’s Ex-Wife Dishes On Couple’s Marriage

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OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion


Kathleen Buhle, Hunter Biden’s ex-wife, has dished on their marriage to People magazine ahead of a tell-all memoir set for release soon called, “If We Break.”

Buhle “is opening up for the first time about the unraveling of her marriage to Hunter Biden, President Joe Biden’s son, which ended in 2017 amid the younger Biden’s then-secret struggles with addiction,” People magazine reported.

“Buhle, a 53-year-old nonprofit development executive, shares what her publisher calls a ‘story of resilience and self-discovery’ in her forthcoming book, If We Break: A Memoir of Marriage, Addiction, and Healing,” the magazine added.

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Due for release June 14, the book will be the first public comments made by Biden’s ex- regarding their divorce or its aftermath, although some details about their split played out in court battles.

The couple married in 1993 and split after around 24 years of marriage. They share three daughters: Naomi, Finnegan, and Maisy.

Interestingly, the book will be released just months before the 2022 midterms, which are already projected to be difficult for Democrats who currently enjoy very thin majorities in both chambers of Congress.

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“When my marriage ended, I felt like I’d lost my sense of who I was,” she told People. “Anyone who has seen addiction ruin a relationship, or been through infidelity and divorce, can tell you how devastating it feels. But what I also realized through those crushing experiences is that I needed to find a way to stand on my own.”

The magazine adds:

In February 2017, Buhle alleged in a legal filing that her estranged ex had spent money on drugs, alcohol, prostitutes, and strip clubs.

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Buhle’s book doesn’t shy away from those previous disclosures; instead, it will shine a light on the “heavy toll” addiction can take on relationships, according to the book’s publisher.

“Writing this book has been incredibly healing for me… and my hope is it will be meaningful to those who have been through addiction or divorce, and especially to women who have felt like their entire identity was tied to their spouse. In the end, divorce allowed me to find my strength,” Buhle asserted.

The publisher describes the book as a “chronicle of radical honesty.”

“For decades, Kathleen Buhle chose to play the role of the good wife, beginning when, as a naïve young woman from a working-class family on the South Side of Chicago, she met the dashing son of a senator at the Jesuit Volunteer Corps in Oregon,” the publisher noted in a release.

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“When Hunter’s drinking evolved into dependency, she was forced to learn how rapidly and irrevocably a marriage can fall apart under the merciless power of addiction,” the release notes further.

While Buhle has largely remained out of the limelight, in recent years Hunter Biden has remained squarely in it.

He’s been outed as having fathered a child with a stripper, become a highly controversial painter, and had a romantic relationship with his late brother’s widow, the latter of which he explained in his own recent memoir.

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Hunter said he was attracted to her “wide eyes and flashing Cheshire cat smile,” adding that he found Hallie Biden “hypnotic” and “incredibly alluring” and said he “could see why my brother fell for her.”

“On the last five years alone, my two-decades-long marriage has dissolved, guns have been put in my face, and at one point I dropped clean off the grid, living in $59-a-night Super 8 motels off the I-95 while scaring my family even more than myself,” he noted in his book, “Beautiful Things.”

In interviews with CBS last year, Hunter Biden said he was convinced he suffered a “trauma” stemming from the 1972 car crash that took the lives of his mother, Neilia, and his infant sister, Naomi, as being responsible for his addictions.

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