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Ann Coulter Raises Questions About Potential Trump VP Pick

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OPINION: This article may contain commentary which reflects the author's opinion.


Conservative writer and commentator Ann Coulter, who was one of the first to be on then-GOP candidate Donald Trump’s bandwagon in 2015 but then soured on him after he took office, has an opinion about someone being floated as a potential running mate for the 45th president as he attempts to win a second term next year.

Coulter has made it clear she doesn’t think it’s a good idea for Trump to pick former Fox News star Tucker Carlson after his name was mentioned earlier this month.

Carlson was at the top of all cable news ratings when he parted ways with Fox in April. It’s still not clear why, but he has since moved to the X platform, where he posts interviews and commentary on some of the most important and controversial issues of the day.

“Meanwhile, Trump, the frontrunner for the 2024 Republican presidential nomination, said in early November that he would consider Carlson as his running mate if he became the GOP’s 2024 nominee. Since then, a growing group of Make America Great Again (MAGA) supporters have voiced their approval on social media,” Newsweek noted on Monday.

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Yet, during a segment of Coulter’s podcast featuring an interview with New York Times reporter Jeremy Peters in early November, they delved into the lawsuit between Fox News and Dominion Voting Systems, which claims the network propagated falsehoods asserting that Dominion’s equipment altered votes from Trump to President Joe Biden in the 2020 presidential election.

Coulter proceeded to ask Peters about Carlson’s sentiments towards Trump in light of the Dominion discovery. This revelation stemmed from the public disclosure of legal documents containing a text conversation between the former Fox host and an unidentified individual. In the exchange, Carlson expressed a strong dislike for Trump, stating that he hated him “passionately” and looked forward to no longer discussing him on air.

“Early on, you heard Tucker basically saying things like, and these are verbatim quotes, that is he is a demonic force, a destroyer, and that he is ultimately responsible for the deaths that happened on January 6. We know that Tucker, like many people at Fox, expressed a deep disdain for Trump and disrespect for him. The discovery showed how little they thought of this man,” Peters said.

Coulter continued bringing up concerns over Carlson’s attitude towards the former president while taking aim at Trump as well in a post to X on Monday, where she shared a clip of her podcast with Peters, writing, “Half the people Trump claims to be considering as his VP (thus smearing them) can’t stand the guy. When he’s not in front of a camera, here’s what Tucker thinks of Trump.”

Newsweek noted further:

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Coulter has had fallings out with Trump over the years, becoming one of his fiercest Republican critics. In August, Coulter described the former president as “a gigantic baby” who “can barely speak English,” while also praising Ron DeSantis ahead of the first 2024 GOP primary debate, in which Trump declined to participate.

Trump has also fired shots in the escalating war of words with Coulter, calling her a “wacky nut job” when her criticism of his failure to complete a U.S.-Mexico border wall was ramping up in 2019. In September, Trump referred to Coulter as a “stone cold loser” and “unbearably crazy.

There is a “real” chance that Trump will ask Carlson to be his running mate in 2024, according to New York Times reporter Maggie Haberman.

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During an interview with host Jamie Weinstein for an episode of The Dispatch Podcast last week, Haberman talked about how the former president plans to fill his new administration with devoted supporters if he wins a second term. Because of this, Weinstein asked Haberman what he thought about rumors that Trump might choose Carlson to be his vice president.

“It’s a real thing that I am hearing as a possibility,” Haberman said. “The likelihood of it, I don’t know.’

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