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Michelle Obama Slams Wisconsin For Holding Primary Voting

Speculation has been rife that former First Lady Michelle Obama will jump into the 2020 presidential race and unite the clearly divided party.

Obama has obviously not entered the race nor does it look like she plans to.

But she has been inching her way off the sidelines and injecting herself into the political scene much more recently.

On Tuesday, the former first lady made a rare political statement when she took to Twitter to chastise Wisconsin for holding their primary vote, saying that the United States needs to “do better to ensure voting is safe for all voters.”

“Today, Wisconsin voters had to choose between making their voice heard and keeping themselves and their family safe,” Michelle tweeted. “No American should ever have to make that choice. We must do better to ensure voting is safe for all voters. The latest Wisconsin voting information is below.”

Wisconsin’s Democratic Gov. Tony Evers, who is responsible for one of the most important battleground states in the 2020 presidential election, recently signed an executive order to postpone the state’s primary election absentee ballot deadline.

However, both the U.S. Supreme Court and the Wisconsin State Supreme Court have stepped in to deliver a last-minute ruling to stop Democrats from changing the primary election rules.

The Wisconsin Supreme Court struck down the Ever’s executive order to postpone the primary election until June, but Republicans immediately took it to court and won.

Then, the U.S. Supreme Court overturned another lower court ruling that gave voters six more days to hand in their absentee ballots.

CNN reported:

The rulings, both on ideological lines by the conservative-led courts, were victories for the Republicans who control the state Senate and Assembly and have opposed all efforts to stop in-person voting from taking place Tuesday because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The Republican National Committee and the Republican Party of Wisconsin had taken over the legal battle on the GOP-led legislature’s behalf, while the state and national Democratic parties had pushed for more lenient rules around absentee voting.

They came despite fears from state and local officials that holding an election in the middle of a pandemic could put the health of poll workers and voters at risk.

Voters will decide on Tuesday the state’s Democratic presidential primary between former Vice President Joe Biden and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, as well as a general elections for a state Supreme Court seat and a host of local offices.

The vacancy on Wisconsin’s Supreme Court is already set to be a gigantic issue this November given Republicans currently hold a 5-2 majority.

In a 5-4 ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court justices argued that changing that deadline “so close to the election date,” and adding six more days for ballots to be cast “fundamentally alters the nature of the election.”

The Court said it did not want to get involved but “when a lower court intervenes and alters the election rules so close to the election date, our precedents indicate that this Court, as appropriate, should correct that error.”

The U.S. Supreme Court vote went along party lines, with all four liberal justices dissented.