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NYPD Moves to Revoke Trump’s License To Carry A Firearm

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OPINION: This article may contain commentary which reflects the author's opinion.


The New York Police Department is attempting to cancel former President Donald Trump’s permit to carry a concealed firearm following his conviction in the New York hush-money case.

According to the New York Times, Trump possessed three handguns registered under his concealed carry permit in New York.

The persons with knowledge of the situation say that two of them were given over to the Police Department’s License Division around the time that Trump was accused of 34 counts of falsifying company documents in April 2023. Florida had previously received a lawful transfer of the third pistol. Whether Trump still has it or not is unknown.

“Under federal law and state law in New York and Florida, people with felony convictions are barred from possessing a firearm. The Police Department will complete an investigation that is likely to lead to the revocation of Mr. Trump’s concealed carry permit, according to the people with knowledge of the matter. Mr. Trump has the right to file a challenge to the move,” the Times reported.

Federal law prohibits those with felonies from possessing firearms, as does state law in Florida and New York.

The persons with knowledge of the situation say that the Police Department will wrap up an investigation that will probably result in Trump’s concealed carry permit being revoked. Trump is free to submit a challenge to the action.

Trump was found guilty on 34 counts of falsifying business records in his Manhattan “hush money” trial.

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Legal experts say Manhattan District Attorney Alvin Bragg’s case against Trump will have “reversible problems” if it is appealed following last week’s guilty verdict.

The former president and presumptive 2024 GOP nominee was charged with 34 counts of falsifying business records in the first degree.

Trump pleaded not guilty, but 12 jurors found him guilty on all counts.

Sentencing is scheduled for July 11, four days before the Republican National Convention. Each count carries a maximum prison sentence of four years.

In total, Trump faces a maximum sentence of 136 years behind bars.

But some legal experts say the trial is “a target-rich environment for appeal,” which Trump is expected to pursue.

“I believe that the case will be reversed eventually either in the state or federal systems,” Jonathan Turley, constitutional law attorney and Fox News contributor, told the network hours after Trump’s conviction.

“However, this was the worst expectation for a trial in Manhattan,” he said. “I had hoped that the jurors might redeem the integrity of a system that has been used for political purposes. The trial is a target-rich environment for appeal. However, that appeal will stretch beyond the election. In the meantime, Democrats and President Biden can add ‘convicted felon’ to the political mantra.”

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John Malcolm, a former federal prosecutor, emphasized to Fox News Digital that he firmly believes the jury’s verdict clearly demonstrates their conviction based on the testimony of Trump’s ex-lawyer, Michael Cohen.

“The jury obviously ended up believing Michael Cohen, which is something I have a hard time conceiving since Michael Cohen has lied every time he has been under oath in the past and admitted that he hates Donald Trump, blaming him for all his problems, stole from him, and will profit from this conviction,” Malcolm said.

Fox News added: “Prosecutors needed to prove beyond a reasonable doubt that Trump falsified business records to conceal a $130,000 payment to Stormy Daniels, a former porn star, in the lead-up to the 2016 election – in an effort to silence her about an alleged affair with Trump in 2006. They were ultimately successful. Trump has denied the affair throughout the trial.”

Gregory Germain, a law professor at Syracuse University College of Law, observed that it was “a terribly risky strategy for Trump to focus on Michael Cohen’s credibility rather than focusing on the convoluted legal basis for the claims.”

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