All Players, Coaches, Refs Kneel And Lock Arms During National Anthem Before Lakers-Clippers Game

All of the players, coaches, and referees took a knee and locked arms on Thursday night during the national anthem before the game between the Los Angeles Clippers and Los Angeles Lakers.

LeBron James and all the other players on the court took a knee during the anthem before the second game of the NBA’s return.

You can watch the moment below.

The move by James and other players during the second game came after every player on the Jazz and Pelicans kneeled during the anthem Thursday.

You can watch them kneeling and wearing Black Lives Matter shirts below.

 

Prior to the NBA’s restart on Thursday, TNT analyst Charles Barkley went viral after he spoke about how everyone should be respected whether they kneel or stand for the national anthem.

Barkley said it was OK if players decided not to kneel as well.

“The thing is, the national anthem means different things to different people,” Barkley said. “I’m glad these guys are all unified, but if people don’t kneel, they’re not a bad person. I want to make that perfectly clear.”

“I’m glad they had unity, but if we have a guy that doesn’t want to kneel or the anthem means something to him, he should not be vilified,” Barkley added.

“That was beautifully done in unity,” Hall of Fame center Shaquille O’Neal said. “Nice to see. Again, when you have your platform, I think it’s very important that you speak up. It’s very important that you speak your mind. When you talk about change, you have to talk about protocol.”

“We use our voice to bring awareness,” O’Neal continued. “You have to go vote … it doesn’t stop with just sending out a tweet or yelling all the time. We have to continue to fight, continue our movement, and you know follow and chase the protocol. Again, I’m proud of everyone.”

“My thing is the National Anthem means different things to different people,” Barkley responded to O’Neal. “I’m glad these guys are all unified, but if people don’t kneel, they’re not a bad person. I want to make that perfectly clear. I’m glad they had unity, but if we have a guy who doesn’t want to kneel because the anthem means something to him, he should not be vilified.”

“Instead of talking about racial equality, racial justice, and economic justice, we spend all our time worrying about who’s kneeling and not kneeling, what things are being said on buses, what’s being said on jerseys. I think we’re missing the point,” Barkley said.

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