‘Potential Imminent Crisis’: U.S. Military Warns Of Russian Military Buildup In Eastern Europe

Written by Martin Walsh

OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion




Joe Biden can’t even protect America’s borders, so it won’t surprise many that now U.S. soldiers are potentially at risk on another border.

A new startling report reveals that the U.S. military in Europe is on “high alert” following a buildup of Russian forces in eastern Ukraine.

According to the New York Times reported, the situation has reportedly “escalated sharply in recent days” after four Ukrainian soldiers were killed during a battle against Russian-backed forces.

The report said that both Russia and Ukraine have acknowledged that tensions are escalating, which puts U.S. troops in the region in possible danger.

“The soldiers’ deaths, along with a buildup of Russian forces on the border, has seized the attention of senior American officials in Europe and Washington,” The NYT reported.

“In the past week, the U.S. military’s European Command raised its watch level from possible crisis to potential imminent crisis — the highest level — in response to the deployment of the additional Russian troops,” the Times added.

The battle, which included machine-gun and artillery fire, has lasted for seven years since breaking out during the Obama administration in 2014.

The report said that officials have discovered “new weaponry” on the Russian-backed side and Russian negotiators have warned that peace talks might be breaking down.

The report added:

This week, Gen. Tod D. Wolters, the head of U.S. European Command, raised the American military’s watch level for the second time in several days after Russian troops failed to leave Ukraine’s border region. American strategists had expected the troops to depart the area, about 30 miles from Ukraine’s border, after the conclusion of a military exercise on March 23. …

The latest violence in eastern Ukraine and the troop buildup could well be a way for Moscow to measure the Biden administration’s commitment to Ukraine, according to current and former officials.

This could be posturing, but the Kremlin is testing the new administration,” said Frederick B. Hodges, a retired lieutenant general and a former top U.S. Army commander in Europe.

The escalating public feud between Russian President Vladimir Putin and Joe Biden rapidly de-escalated last month after the White House put on the brakes.

In particular, the Biden administration has pushed back on an invitation from the Russian leader to conduct a “live” debate with Biden for the world to see.

And why? Because, apparently, the U.S. president is “quite busy” taking care of things.

Putin issued his challenge on Thursday after Biden’s warning that Putin would “pay a price” following a disputed U.S. intelligence report claiming that Moscow attempted to interfere in the 2020 election. In addition, Biden also agreed with ABC News host George Stephanopoulos that Putin is a killer.

“I want to propose to President Biden to continue our discussion, but on the condition that we do it basically live, as it’s called. Without any delays and directly in an open, direct discussion. It seems to me that would be interesting for the people of Russia and for the people of the United States,” Putin told a reporter in Moscow.

“I don’t want to put this off for long. I want to go to the taiga this weekend to relax a little. So we could do it tomorrow or Monday. We are ready at any time convenient for the American side,” he continued.

“You know, I remember, in childhood, when we were arguing with each other in the courtyard, we would say, ‘I know you are, but what am I?’ and that’s no accident. It’s not just a childish saying. There is a very deep meaning in that.”

During a press briefing, White House press secretary Jen Psaki responded to the challenge.

“I don’t have anything to report to you in terms of a future meeting,” Psaki said.