Report: Biden’s DOJ Had ‘Backup’ Plan To Arrest Derek Chauvin ‘Immediately’ If He Was Found Not Guilty

Written by Martin Walsh

OPINION: This article contains commentary which reflects the author's opinion




Former Minneapolis police officer Chauvin, who was charged with second-degree unintentional murder, third-degree murder, and second-degree manslaughter, was found guilty on all charges.

But now a new shocking report reveals that had the jury found him not guilty, Joe Biden’s Department of Justice had a secret “back-up plan” to arrest Chauvin.

According to the Minneapolis Star Tribune, DOJ officials conducted a secretive investigation into the former police officer.

They had contingency plans to swoop into the courthouse and arrest him on federal charges if he was acquitted or if there was a mistrial.

According to the Star Tribune:

“Leading up to Derek Chauvin’s murder trial, Justice Department officials had spent months gathering evidence to indict the ex-Minneapolis police officer on federal police brutality charges, but they feared the publicity frenzy could disrupt the state’s case. So they came up with a contingency plan: If Chauvin were found not guilty on all counts or the case ended in a mistrial, they would arrest him at the courthouse, according to sources familiar with the planning discussions.”

“Under the contingency arrest plan, the Minnesota U.S. Attorney’s Office would have charged Chauvin by criminal complaint — a quicker alternative for a federal charge that doesn’t require a grand jury — so they could arrest him immediately, and then asked a grand jury for an indictment, according to sources, who were not authorized to speak publicly,” the newspaper reported.

Biden’s DOJ is not stopping there, either.

The Justice Department is opening a sweeping investigation into policing practices in Minneapolis.

“Yesterday’s verdict in the state criminal trial does not address potentially systemic policing issues in Minneapolis,” Attorney General Merrick Garland said.

The Associated Press reported:

The new investigation is known as a “pattern or practice” — examining whether there is a pattern or practice of unconstitutional or unlawful policing — and will be a more sweeping probe of the entire police department and may result in major changes to policing there.

It will examine the use of force by police officers, including force used during protests, and whether the department engages in discriminatory practices. It will also look into the department’s handling of misconduct allegations and its treatment of people with behavioral health issues and will assess the department’s current systems of accountability, Garland said.

Garland said a public report would be issued, if the department finds a pattern or practice of unconstitutional policing.

The department could also bring a lawsuit against the police department, which in the past have typically ended in settlement agreements or consent decrees to force changes.

Politicians, mainly on the Democrat side of the aisle, have seized the Floyd case and used it as a soapbox to call for more police reform.

Then there was California Rep. Maxine Waters, who caused controversy when she called for protesters to be “more confrontational” if Chauvin was not found guilty of murder.

After the prosecution and defense gave their closing arguments in the case on the death of George Floyd, the judge in the case said that Waters’ comments made this weekend could be cause for an appeal.

Judge Peter A. Cahill absolutely scorched Waters in his response, in which he declined to declare a mistrial in the case.

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His remarks came after the comments by Waters were heard at a protest for Floyd and for Daunte Wright, who was also killed in a confrontation with police.

“I hope that we’re going to get a verdict that says guilty guilty guilty,” she “And if we don’t, we cannot go away.”

When reporters asked what people should do if there was not a guilty verdict she said, “We’ve got to stay on the street. And we’ve got to get more active, we’ve got to get more confrontational. We’ve got to make sure that they know that we mean business.”